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Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style presents two basic documentation systems, the humanities style (notes and bibliography) and the author-date system. Choosing between the two often depends on subject matter and nature of sources cited, as each system is favored by different groups of scholars.

The humanities style is preferred by many in literature, history, and the arts. This style presents bibliographic information in notes and, often, a bibliography. It accommodates a variety of sources, including esoteric ones less appropriate to the author-date system.

The more concise author-date system has long been used by those in the physical, natural, and social sciences. In this system, sources are briefly cited in the text, usually in parentheses, by author’s last name and date of publication. The short citations are amplified in a list of references, where full bibliographic information is provided.

Online guides

Data sets

Bibliography style (based on documentation for books):

Milberger, Sharon. Evaluation of Violence Against Women With Physical Disabilities in Michigan, 2000-2001. ICPSR version. Detroit: Wayne State University, 2002. Distributed by Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research, 2002. doi:10.3886/ICPSR03414.

Author-Date style:

Milberger, Sharon. 2002. Evaluation of Violence Against Women With Physical Disabilities in Michigan, 2000-2001. ICPSR version. Detroit: Wayne State University. Distributed by Ann Arbor, MI: Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research. doi:10.3886/ICPSR03414.

Example sites

Print style guides

The Chicago Manual of Style.
Edition: 16th edition.
Publication Info.: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 1982-
Call Number: PN147 .M36
 

EndNote output styles

(Chicago 16 A style uses footnotes. Chicago 16 B style does not use footnotes.)


Style manuals in the University Libraries collections

Book and ebook versions of major styles guides.


EndNote at Virginia Tech

    EndNote

EndNote is bibliographic manager software allows researchers to save and organize results of database searches or lists of bibliographic references. A web-based product called EndNote Online is also available.


EndNote Online

EndNote Online is the cloud-based version of EndNote. There is a free version anyone (including alumni) can use; students, faculty, and staff have access to the full version of EndNote web (that can sync with your installed desktop version) because of our subscription to Web of Science. You can install browser extensions to ease access to your EndNote libraries while searching online.