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    Early English Books Online
This resource is restricted to Virginia Tech users only Screencast tutorials available for this resource Contents of this resource available through Summon

Early English Books Online from Chadwick

Early English Books Online (EEBO) contains digital facsimile page images of virtually every work printed in England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales and British North America and works in English printed elsewhere from 1473-1700 - from the first book printed in English by William Caxton, through the age of Spenser and Shakespeare and the tumult of the English Civil War.

This collection now contains about 100,000 of over 125,000 titles listed in Pollard & Redgrave's Short-Title Catalogue (1475-1640) and Wing's Short-Title Catalogue (1641-1700) and their revised editions, as well as the Thomason Tracts (1640-1661) collection and the Early English Books Tract Supplement. Subject areas include English literature, history, philosophy, linguistics, theology, music, fine arts, education, mathematics, and science.

Great Literary Works

With this collection, scholars and students of literature can examine the earliest editions of such classics as Chaucer's Canterbury Tales and Malory's Morte d'Arthur. Textual scholars are able to compare variations in the early quarto editions of Shakespeare's plays with the renowned First Folio edition of 1623, and the great Renaissance authors can be studied in light of lesser-known literature from the era.

Material for the Historian

The original, printed version of royal statutes and proclamations, military, religious, legal, Parliamentary, and other public documents are reproduced in the collection. And social historians gain insight into the lives of the common people through almanacs and calendars, broadsides and romances, plus popular pamphlets such as The Trail of Witchcraft, showing the true and righte method of discovery (1616).

Research in Religion

Scholars will find a host of sermons, homilies, saints' lives, liturgies, and the Book of Common Prayer (1549). The King James translation of the Bible (1611) can be studied in relation to earlier English translations, and Latin, Greek, and Welsh translations invite comparison with the English version.

Other areas of study for:

  • science historians - beginnings of modern science
  • political scientists - debates on the divine right of kings
  • classicists - Greek and Latin authors in influential Renaissance translations such as Chapman's Homer
  • linguists - definitive data for the study of Early Modern English
  • musicologists - numerous early English ballads and carols
  • art historians and bibliophiles - a unique opportunity to analyze early typefaces and book illustrations

Additional links

Rights

  • Concurrent users:  
  • Permissions:  
  • Restrictions:  
  • ILL:  
  • Authorized users:  
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Coverage

1473-1700

Date

September 13, 2010


Legend

restricted resource Resource is restricted to current Virginia Tech students, faculty, and staff. Use Off Campus Sign In if not on the campus network.
licensed for Virginia Tech alumni access Resource is licensed for Virginia Tech alumni access. Use Alumni Library Portal Sign In to access.
freely accessible database Freely accessible database, available to anyone without restriction
mobile interface Mobile interface available, see description for link.
Screencast tutorial available Screencast tutorial available, icon linked to list.
Contents in summon Contents of this database are in Summon.
get VText Resource provides Get VText links to access full text.
gold open access - publishing Resource provides open access publishing opportunities and open access publications.
get VText Resource provides self archiving opportunities and open access documents.

Warning

NOTE: Most items obtained from this page are subscribed to by the library and accessible only to Virginia Tech students, faculty, and staff.
 
WARNING: The abuse of Virginia Tech licensed online resources by such means as systematic downloading violates the university's acceptable use policy, jeopardizes Tech's future access to resources, and is prohibited.